10 tricks for spotting a bad company to work for

The job search process can easily drain you of your energy and confidence and even of your will to keep going until you have found the right one. But accepting the first offer you might receive could turn out to be even worse than being unemployed for a little longer. Me and Alex, we both turned down many offers. Some of them because of obvious reasons but others just because our gut told us to say no.

I chose 10 of the red flags everyone should be aware of when considering a job offer.

1. They want to hire you right away

It might be because you are very good and they consider you a good asset to the team. But it could also mean that they are desperate and willing to hire anyone. I remember that this happened to us once. We applied for job in a big hotel in Malta and got a reply that the Human Resources team are checking our resumes and we shall get a response by the end of a week. That week passed and the hotel went radio silent. Usually we would take that as a no and forget about it, but we were desperate so we emailed them again. They replied with 2 job offers with our names on it and the salaries for a whole year. That was a huge red flag! They offered us the jobs without even a short interview by phone. I mean who does that?

2. The company has a bad reputation

I know that all of us apply to everything on the market because you never know who might contact you back, but as soon you have an interview scheduled you should do some research. Not only because it will help you during the interview, but because you might find out that maybe you shouldn’t waste your time on that interview and keep searching. some of the reviews could be from frustrated members from the staff that maybe got fired and posted that review as revenge, but if most of them are the same…Well, another red flag!

3. You had a bad gut feeling

Most of the directors and recruiters trust their guts when hiring people, why shouldn’t you listen to your own gut when refusing a job?

4. Your duties remain unclear

It’s not possible to accept a job if you don’t know what you are supposed to do once they hire you. I always say no to “This and some other related job duties”. Define those other duties. When I answered your questions I don’t recall saying that I speak English and some other languages. I was specific. I expect the same.

5. There is a pattern of people leaving constantly and they are always looking for new staff

Do I even need to explain why this is another red flag?

6. People are talking behind each other’s back.

I couldn’t work in such an environment. I couldn’t trust anyone and I would probably be grumpy and angry all the time.

7. You are not given the opportunity to speak to your manager

You should ask yourself why that person doesn’t get a say in choosing his next employees? He/She doesn’t care enough? Or is he/she reliable? Is that person making her/his own decisions? Will they let you make your own decisions? The list could go on and on but let’s keep it short and agree that this is another huge red flag.

8. Your first impression is bad

First impressions are always important. They could easily change and you could be wrong of course, but why should you take that risk? What if you were right the whole time but you ended up accepting that job anyway? Thank God for the probationary period otherwise you would be stuck there for 6 months of even more.

Our not so long work experience helped us put together this list of 8 red flags that each person who is seeking for a job should be aware of. It kind of annoys me that we only found 8 so feel free to complete our list with your personal experience. We want at least 2 more red flags to have a perfect round number.

 

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